Distributed learning is not for everyone. Courses require the same amount of work as traditional classes and meet the same course objectives. Some students may actually spend additional time working on a courses taken online because of the amount of reading required to complete assignments. It also takes more self-discipline and dedication to succeed in an online learning environment due to the absence of face-to-face interaction and mandatory physical attendance associated with classroom-based courses. Just like a traditional class, you have to be on top of your studies. You still have to read the textbook and/or other class reading materials; you still have to follow notes, hand in writing assignments on time, and do well on any quizzes or exams you may need to take. In short, virtual learning requires different attitudes, self-motivation, ability to set goals, a degree of experimentation/risk-taking, and time management skills. If you possess these skills, you will do well in a online class.

 
Students Typically Suited To Online Learning
  • They are self-motivated to learn and succeed.
  • They are conscientious as the virtual environment put additional responsibility for learning on the shoulders of the student.
  • They are happy not dominating class time. A virtual classroom is more democratic than a traditional classroom. The student who dominates a class from the front row is less happy here.
  • They are students who enjoy learning, who like to figure things out, and who enjoy independence and reading.
  • They need not be a star student. Someone who learns at a slower-than-average pace can also succeed in virtual classes.
  • They are students who need scheduling flexibility so they can complete their work at times convenient for them.
 
Students Typically Not Suited To Online Learning
  • The student who doesn't like school for reasons that have to do with learning.
  • The student who procrastinates will have difficulty meeting deadlines.
  • The student who has a severe disability that hinders reading, for example.
  • The student who is placed in an online classroom without wanting to be there will probably fail. In a online classroom, the student has to engage and have initiative.
  • The student who take a full class load at a traditional school and participates in lots of extra-curricular activities may think a online class is an easy way to pick up extra credits. This is not the case.